All Saints Antiochian Orthodox Church

Books by Father Patrick Henry Reardon

Patrick Henry Reardon is pastor of All Saints' Orthodox Church in Chicago, Illinois, and a senior editor of Touchstone magazine.

Wise Lives, Orthodox Christian Reflections on the Wisdom of Sirach

Wise_Lives

Description:
The wisdom of Sirach.

Sirach represents the more primitive and conservative aspect of Israel's Wisdom tradition- the practical application of the fear of God to daily life-but he enhances that tradition by a singular attention to biography and historical literature in the shaping of the soul. In Short, Wise Lives.

For for more information about this book, or to order, please visit the Conciliar Press website HERE.

Christ in the Psalms

Christ in the Psalms

Description:
A classic on the Psalms and a reader favorite.

A highly inspirational book of meditations on the Psalms by one of the most insightful and challenging Orthodox writers of our day. Avoiding both syruppy sentimentality arid scholasticism, Christ in the Psalms takes the reader on a thought-provoking and enlightening pilgrimage through this beloved "Prayer Book" of the Church.

Lively, and highly devotional, this book sheds a world of insight upon the beloved Scriptures, the world of the Early Church, and of the Apostles themselves, who constantly used and referred to the Psalms in their own writings.

For for more information about this book, or to order, please visit the Conciliar Press website HERE.

Christ in His Saints

Christ in His Saints

Description:
Fr. Patrick Reardon examines the lives of 150 heroes and saints from the Scriptures.

In this long-awaited sequel to Christ in the Psalms, popular pastor and scholar, Patrick Henry Reardon, once again applies his keen intellect to a topic he loves most dearly. Here he examines the lives of almost one hundred and fifty saints and heroes from the Scriptures, everyone from Abigail to Zephaniah, Adam to St. John the Theologian. This well-researched work is a veritable cornucopia of Bible personalities: Old Testament Saints, New Testament Saints, "Repentant Saints", "Zealous saints", "Saints under pressure" . . . they’re all here, and their stories are both fascinating and uplifting.

But Christ in His Saints is far more than just a biblical "who’s who". These men and women represent that ancient family into which, by baptism, all believers have been incorporated. Together they compose that great "cloud of witnesses" cheering us on and inspiring us through word and deed.

For for more information about this book, or to order, please visit the Conciliar Press website HERE.
 

The Trial of Job: Orthodox Christian Reflections on the Book of Job

The Trial of Job

Description:
“The Book of Job always constituted essential and formative reading about the ways of the soul. This has always been the conviction of the spiritual classics through the centuries. Yet, for some reason, the figure of Job is elusive to us—possibly because he seems so comfortably distant; or perhaps because he seems so frightfully close.

Review:
"What Fr. Patrick Reardon achieves with this book is to render Job comprehensible (to those of us who are still lay readers of scripture), tangible (to those who have not yet tasted the way of darkness and despair), and accessible (to those who have already experienced any form of brokenness and broken-heartedness). Ultimately, all of us identify with one or another aspect of Job’s life. As life inevitably informs and as this book intuitively confirms, one cannot sing Psalms without having read Job!”
—Fr. John Chryssavgis

For for more information about this book, or to order, please visit the Conciliar Press website HERE.

Chronicles of History and Worship

Chronicles of History and Worship

Description:
Another title by Patrick Henry Reardon in his Bible Commentary Series.

The Old Testament Books of Chronicles contain some of the most neglected passages in all of Scripture. Understanding their message can be difficult and daunting task for the modern reader. Patrick Reardon brings these important books to life, unfolding their powerful message for our own day and age. Like any family history, the story of Chronicles is told with a distinct purpose in mind. It asks the question: "What was the real and lasting significance of King David and his house?" Beginning with the long list of names of the first chapter, this heritage is revealed in cosmic significance. It has in fact become the family tree of every true believer.

For for more information about this book, or to order, please visit the Conciliar Press website HERE.

Creation and the Patriarchal Histories

Creation and the Patriarchal Histories

Description:
The Book of Genesis is foundational reading for the Christian, concerned as it is with the origins of our race and the beginnings of salvation history. Its opening pages provide the theological suppositions of the entire biblical story: Creation, especially that of man in God’s image, the structure of time, man’s relationship to God, the entrance of sin into the world, and God’s selection of a specific line of revelation that will give structure to history. Early Christian writers such as St. Paul saw no dichotomy between the writings of the Law, of which Genesis is the beginning, and the Gospel. Rather, the Gospel is the key to understanding the Law.

In Creation and the Patriarchal Histories, Fr. Reardon shows clearly how the proper understanding of Creation and the Fall informs all of Christian doctrine, and how the narratives of the patriarchs from Noah to Joseph pave the way for the salvation history that continues in Exodus.

Review:
"Genesis needs to be freed from some broad cultural assumptions that color our reading of it argues Fr. Patrick Henry Reardon in Creation and the Patriarchal Histories. We must unshackle Genesis from the strictures of philosophical materialism (evolutionary theory and its flip-side: scientific creationism), and rediscover its literary character to discern its deep theological penetration into the nature of the creation. All too often Genesis is dismissed as 'unscientific.' Both conclusions miss the point. Genesis, Fr. Reardon teaches, reveals that the creation is logo-centric -- it was created by the Word of God, and it is held together by the Word of God's power. The word of Scripture, then, is primarily a literary text, not history (itself a narrative) or a scientific tract. Only by first approaching Genesis as literature can the theological content of the book (which Fr. Reardon provides in this commentary) be properly discerned, and only then will Genesis' rightful place as the foundational narrative of Christian culture and civilization be restored. Any serious student of scripture and culture will benefit from reading the book."

-- Fr. Hans Jacobse, editor of OrthodoxyToday.org.

For for more information about this book, or to order, please visit the Conciliar Press website HERE.